Exploring what it means to be "mixed" by questioning, redefining ourselves, and celebrating
the beauty of multiethnic identities.
We post story/photo submissions, reblogs, articles, resources, and discussions.
To be featured on our blog, click the submit button below!

bella-vida-en-seoul:

lifelovekorea:

posukkum:

Pray for South Korea

Almost crying.

ㅠㅠ

These messages turned out not to be real, but please keep the passengers on your mind.

(via thisisnotkorea)

Mixed-Race Celebrities on Race, in their Own Words | TIME.com →

weareallmixedup:

"I’ve spoken to a lot of audiences of biracial people, and I’ve met a lot of young people who were really confused about their identity. I tell them, ‘You owe it to yourself to figure out who you are and know who you are, but you don’t owe it to anyone else to explain it or defend it.’” 

My mother’s from Korea, my father is from Jamaica; I’m from London.
Black, asian & white.
http://moonbailey.tumblr.com/

My mother’s from Korea, my father is from Jamaica; I’m from London.

Black, asian & white.

http://moonbailey.tumblr.com/

Anonymous asked: This blog is great! I'm half Mexican, quarter Korean and a quarter Irish. this blog makes me feel better about having issues identifying with what I am. I always feel confused because I'm Mexican but there is Spanish in my family too so I don't really know what to list.

Thanks for visiting! :) 

There are no rules on how you identify! If you are able to explore your family heritage by all means do so. For me, I identify most with my parents and grandparents heritage because I’ve had immediate access to their cultural knowledge growing up. 

-Em

Anonymous asked: Scrolling through and every single person looks so beautiful!

:)

It took a long time for me to gain pride in being mixed. I grew up wanting to be like my friends, who were predominantly white. My brother, at the age of three, used to tell people that he was “Amurrican”, emphasizing his rural accent so strangers might pay more attention to nationality rather than the slant of his eyes. Even though the local Chinese community was much more accepting, Chinese school was a struggle; both of us sullen and bored and overly aware of being the “most white” kids there. 
And yet, we came from a very diverse, tolerant area. The fact that I wasn’t comfortable with my identity until high school is just a testimonial to the strength of will people of mixed race need to maintain, whether their community is open or not. I am so grateful that I learned to embrace my ancestry, and truly hope that everyone else will be able to also.
Being mixed is beautiful. “What are you?” is not an insult, it is a point of pride. At this point in time, slurs like “mutt” and “half-breed” are compliments to me. Yes, I am mixed. Thank you for noticing. 
My name is Anna, and I am half Taiwanese and half Caucasian. Find me at thefoxinthebranches.tumblr.com

It took a long time for me to gain pride in being mixed. I grew up wanting to be like my friends, who were predominantly white. My brother, at the age of three, used to tell people that he was “Amurrican”, emphasizing his rural accent so strangers might pay more attention to nationality rather than the slant of his eyes. Even though the local Chinese community was much more accepting, Chinese school was a struggle; both of us sullen and bored and overly aware of being the “most white” kids there. 

And yet, we came from a very diverse, tolerant area. The fact that I wasn’t comfortable with my identity until high school is just a testimonial to the strength of will people of mixed race need to maintain, whether their community is open or not. I am so grateful that I learned to embrace my ancestry, and truly hope that everyone else will be able to also.

Being mixed is beautiful. “What are you?” is not an insult, it is a point of pride. At this point in time, slurs like “mutt” and “half-breed” are compliments to me. Yes, I am mixed. Thank you for noticing. 

My name is Anna, and I am half Taiwanese and half Caucasian. Find me at thefoxinthebranches.tumblr.com

Sarika Sookdeo
@TheRadiant5

Sarika Sookdeo

@TheRadiant5

Anonymous asked: your blog is so uplifting I often feel not like everyone else for not being just one race and seeing so many other people like me is amazing love your blog ❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️

This is why we do it! Thank you :) 

Keep the submissions coming through!

-Em 

Race is not a biological category that naturally produces health disparities because of genetic differences. Race is a political category that has staggering biological consequences because of the impact of social inequality on people’s health.

— Dorothy E. Roberts, Fatal Intervention (via betheintrepid)

(Source: lamaracuya, via weareallmixedup)

my mom is filipina and my dad is french canadian… my grandfather on my dad’s side was adopted but we think he was part native american. 

my mom is filipina and my dad is french canadian… my grandfather on my dad’s side was adopted but we think he was part native american.