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Anonymous asked: I am at a predominantly white uni But i am mixed. I think they mean it as a compliment, but the people here always describe my looks as "exotic", and say I have "exotic beauty".... I was born and raised in the states. am I wrong for being offended by these comments? What do I say to them?

You’re definitely not in the wrong. Those kinds of comments are very othering and fetishistic. I’m sorry you have to go through that. If you respond with something sarcastic or snippy and they get offended, that’s their problem. Respond in any way that makes you more comfortable, I know some people get too anxious with responding sarcastically and work around it, while others snap and that’s okay too. You don’t deserve to be treated like this. 

-Lee

Dique mixed will end racism.

fogo-av:

People keep saying that a mixed raced society will end racism and history proves that untrue and dumb.
All of Latin America proves this. You got a continent of people indoctrinated to mixing. Legit laws and treaties were passed to bring whites into Latin America in hopes to making mixed race people because por lo meno, their’s sangre buena. Making mixed raced babies for the purpose of anti-racism is as dangerous as blanquamiemto and mejorando la raza.
Don’t

^^ to the “end racism, make mixed babies!!” folks -___-

(via weareallmixedup)

whitepeoplesaidwhat:

Customer: So what are you?

Me: American.

Customer: (laughs) You know what I mean.

(via weareallmixedup)

My dad is French and Hispanic; from Panama. My mom is a Filipina and Native
I live in Canada 

My dad is French and Hispanic; from Panama. My mom is a Filipina and Native

I live in Canada 

My latino family is full of blue and green eyes, even redheads and blondes are common at our dinner table. Most of us carry a surname of Italian origin, although our definition of culture couldn’t possibly in any way be categorized. Our pirate hearts (since crossing the Atlantic ocean) never chose to be caged, repressed or labeled. We rather preferred to handpick our own treasures of way of living, to form our culture together and grow stronger as a family. Practicing our native culture and religion alongside scattered beliefs of the catholic church is a challenge of respect but, as I was growing up, it taught me that religion doesn’t matter as long as you believe.
Whereas, biggest lesson I learned being multi: Whether it’s about religion, sexuality, relationships, culture, politics or even if it’s just about the way you’re supposed to eat your pasta.. You always have a choice to be whoever you are. And that choice is always but your own. Wherever I go (I know you feel me on this) people appear to be most comfortable with labeling me to whatever they identify and/or are farmilliar with.
"You have a God so you must be a …""What are you more?""How can you feel Latina when you are European?""You’re more of a gypsy than anything else."
Stretch out your arms and you’ll see that eventually you will find every corner of the world map! Surrounding yourself with different minded people is just a chance for you to get more conscious of the world that you are a part of.
Big love!

Our beautiful roots:Left … 50% Spanish, 18.75% Italian, 12.5% English, 12.5% Inca (Aymara/Atacama), 6.25% FrenchRight … 25% Russian, 12.5% Lithuanian, 12.5% Polish, 12.5% Spanish, 12.5% English, 12.5% Italian, 6.25% French, 6.25% MapucheBoth 100% Chilenas!

My latino family is full of blue and green eyes, even redheads and blondes are common at our dinner table. Most of us carry a surname of Italian origin, although our definition of culture couldn’t possibly in any way be categorized. Our pirate hearts (since crossing the Atlantic ocean) never chose to be caged, repressed or labeled. We rather preferred to handpick our own treasures of way of living, to form our culture together and grow stronger as a family. Practicing our native culture and religion alongside scattered beliefs of the catholic church is a challenge of respect but, as I was growing up, it taught me that religion doesn’t matter as long as you believe.

Whereas, biggest lesson I learned being multi: Whether it’s about religion, sexuality, relationships, culture, politics or even if it’s just about the way you’re supposed to eat your pasta.. You always have a choice to be whoever you are. And that choice is always but your own. Wherever I go (I know you feel me on this) people appear to be most comfortable with labeling me to whatever they identify and/or are farmilliar with.

"You have a God so you must be a …"
"What are you more?"
"How can you feel Latina when you are European?"
"You’re more of a gypsy than anything else."

Stretch out your arms and you’ll see that eventually you will find every corner of the world map! Surrounding yourself with different minded people is just a chance for you to get more conscious of the world that you are a part of.

Big love!

Our beautiful roots:
Left … 50% Spanish, 18.75% Italian, 12.5% English, 12.5% Inca (Aymara/Atacama), 6.25% French
Right … 25% Russian, 12.5% Lithuanian, 12.5% Polish, 12.5% Spanish, 12.5% English, 12.5% Italian, 6.25% French, 6.25% Mapuche
Both 100% Chilenas!

Syrian, Scottish, Turkic, Saami, French and French-Canadian. Born and raised throughout the Pacific Northwest. I don’t feel I’m “Enough” of anything, or too much of everything else to identify with specific cultures. I’ve been told too many times that a quarter of something does not make me that ethnicity.selkietears.tumblr.com

Syrian, Scottish, Turkic, Saami, French and French-Canadian. Born and raised throughout the Pacific Northwest.

I don’t feel I’m “Enough” of anything, or too much of everything else to identify with specific cultures. I’ve been told too many times that a quarter of something does not make me that ethnicity.

selkietears.tumblr.com

Dad - Jamaican Mum - Scottish
http://shirleyannek.tumblr.com

Dad - Jamaican
Mum - Scottish

http://shirleyannek.tumblr.com

My younger sister and I - We’re both Black and Japanese and identify as both. We both are misidentified on a daily basis by individuals who ask constantly what we are. We’ve basically come to accept that as a normal activity and have come to question the importance of identification in social situations. 

My younger sister and I - We’re both Black and Japanese and identify as both. We both are misidentified on a daily basis by individuals who ask constantly what we are. We’ve basically come to accept that as a normal activity and have come to question the importance of identification in social situations. 

Me and my silly boyfriend. I’m part african american, part colombian. Proud to be a mixed race girl. Proud to be in a mixed race relationship! ❤

Me and my silly boyfriend. I’m part african american, part colombian. Proud to be a mixed race girl. Proud to be in a mixed race relationship! ❤

Anonymous asked: I am often asked about my hair (whether it is real or not) and its 100% mine... I often get asked what I am as does my mom because we don't really fit into a category. What advice do you have for someone who is struggling with racial identity? Thanks :-)

That sucksss. I would say first, accept that some people are just going to be ignorant and have no knowledge of how these kinds of questions actually affect people.

And secondly build towards trying to accept yourself regardless because it doesn’t have to be your job to educate or even acknowledge those kinds of things.

As for struggling with identity… thats tough because we all have different conflicts that are probably influenced by our families, childhoods and/or where we live. So it’s different for everyone but I’ve found that finding supportive communities whether online or off, with people that share similar experiences or accept me for me is what’s helped the most.

I always got asked if my hair was “real” or “mine” when I was younger and people would ask if my dad is really my dad and what he is and it was weird and annoying but I can’t exactly fault people for wondering because the media erases the struggles of people who aren’t mono racial or who don’t appear as such so how would they know unless they care to make an effort to learn about it? But it’s not our responsibility to educate them unless we feel it’s worth it.

I think one’s personal identity is constantly developing and it’s okay to be unsure sometimes and try out what feels comfortable. You don’t have to answer to anyone you don’t want.

-Jas